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North American Energy Infrastructure: Will Congress Act? May 29th Event

In the last few years, North America has experienced an energy renaissance as advances in technology and techniques have spurred major increases in oil and natural gas production. However, these abundant energy resources will only substantially benefit the North American economy and consumers in the long run if necessary infrastructure is planned, permitted, and built to integrate supply and demand in an efficient and expeditious manner. The recent rail accidents involving petroleum tank cars have focused more concern on the issue of energy infrastructure, particularly in the United States. Moreover, without expanding energy logistics capacity North American competitiveness may suffer as energy markets in Asia and Europe advance.

With ongoing questions surrounding the adequacy of energy infrastructure and the Keystone XL pipeline still on hold, Hudson Institute hosted a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Representative Gene Green (D-TX-29).

Rep. Green is principal co-sponsor of bipartisan legislation, the North American Energy Infrastructure Act (H.R. 3301), which aims to modernize the current permitting process for the construction of natural gas and petroleum pipelines and electrical power lines that would cross the boundaries of the United States. On Thursday, May 29th, Rep. Green joined Senior Fellow Christopher Sands to discuss the status of North American energy infrastructure and prospects for congressional action this year related to U.S. energy policy.

Panel

John Walters Introductory Remarks

Chief Operating Officer, Hudson Institute

Gene Green Speaker

United States Representative (D-TX); Committee on Energy & Commerce; subcommittees on Oversight & Investigations, Health, Environment & Economy, and Energy & Power

Christopher Sands Speaker

Senior Fellow and Director, Initiative on North American Competitiveness, Hudson Institute

Experts

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