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NATO Summit Must Make Further Progress on Smart Defense

Richard Weitz

Next month’s NATO summit needs to make greater progress on so-called Smart Defense, the alliance-wide effort to get more collective benefits out of individual members’ defense budgets. The initiative aims to induce NATO governments to acquire military capabilities collectively that they cannot afford individually, so that even members with limited resources can contribute to expensive joint projects.

The May 2012 Chicago summit launched almost two dozen Smart Defense projects in such areas as logistics and sustainment; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and force protection. One country leads each project. For example, Germany is in charge of pooling maritime patrol aircraft; France leads the effort to establish multinational field hospitals; and Denmark heads the project to improve cooperation in procuring, storing and maintaining a wide variety of munitions. …

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