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Hudson Institute Mourns the Loss of Distinguished Fellow Judge Robert Bork

Hudson Institute

Hudson Institute mourns the loss of Distinguished Fellow Judge Robert Bork. He was 85.

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Distinguished Fellow Robert Bork

“Robert Bork was a giant, a brilliant and fearless legal scholar, and a gentleman whose incredible wit and erudition made him a wonderful Hudson colleague,” said Hudson President and CEO Kenneth Weinstein. “He will be sorely missed by his friends and colleagues at Hudson Institute.”

Judge Bork served as Solicitor General from 1973 to 1977; acting Attorney General from 1973 to 1974; and Circuit Judge of the U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit from 1982 to 1988. He was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to the position of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on July 1, 1987. Confirmation was denied by the Senate on October 23 of that year. In February 1988 he resigned as Circuit Judge and joined the American Enterprise Institute from which he resigned in November 2003, joining Hudson Institute.  Judge Bork served as the Alexander M. Bickel Professor of Public Law at Yale Law School from 1962 to 1981 with time off to serve as Solicitor General. Bork obtained both his J.D. and his B.A. from the University of Chicago.

 


Encounter Books is publishing Bork’s latest book Saving Justice: Watergate, The Saturday Night Massacre and Other Adventures of a Solicitor General in May 2013.

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