Skip to main content

In Ukraine Crisis, China Chooses Russia Ties Over Principles

Richard Weitz

Russia’s military occupation and impending annexation of the Crimea in Ukraine has put Beijing in a difficult spot, confronting Chinese leaders with numerous competing priorities and principles. Having cultivated good relations with both Russia and Ukraine, they would prefer to avoid antagonizing one party by siding too closely with the other. Yet, China’s recent approach shows how Beijing is now more willing to dilute longstanding foreign policy principles to align with Moscow.

Throughout the months of unrest in Ukraine, Chinese media commentary has generally echoed Russia’s line that Western machinations were contributing to the instability in Kiev, which finally led to the change of regime that triggered Russia’s military intervention in the Crimean Peninsula. Beijing can hardly have welcomed the specter of another mass movement overthrowing a government. In addition to recalling earlier “color revolutions” in which pro-Western factions toppled longstanding pro-Moscow rulers in some of the former Soviet republics, Chinese analysts have warned that these same forces were seeking to overturn China’s communist system.

Click here to read the full article on WorldPoliticsReview.com

Related Articles

Who Must Lead a Muslim Reformation

Naser Khader

In 2015, Europeans have been forced to realize that Islamic terrorists are living in our midst. But for those of us who are European and Muslim, the c...

Continue Reading

Lee Kuan Yew vs. the News

Melanie Kirkpatrick

Singapore’s late prime minister wanted to know: Where was his copy of the Journal?...

Continue Reading

Why Hasn't Obama Closed Gitmo?

Arthur Herman

Some do see the sense of keeping Gitmo open, including the president himself—although he refuses to acknowledge it....

Continue Reading