Skip to main content
Did FTC v. Qualcomm Create an Antitrust Duty to License SEPs?
Federal Trade Commission building in Washington, DC

Did FTC v. Qualcomm Create an Antitrust Duty to License SEPs?

Urška Petrovčič

In May 2019, Judge Lucy H. Koh of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued a decision in FTC v. Qualcomm. She found that Qualcomm violated the Sherman Act by, among other things, refusing to offer a license to its standard essential patents (“SEPs”) to rival manufacturers of baseband processor modems. Some commentators have suggested that the effects of Judge Koh’s judgment transcend the litigation brought against Qualcomm and create for SEP holders a general duty to offer a license to SEPs to component manufacturers. However, Judge Koh’s conclusions about the existence of an antitrust duty to license have little support in either the facts of the case or in courts’ prior decisions. It is questionable whether they will survive the scrutiny of the Ninth Circuit or, upon further appeal, the Supreme Court of the United States.

Read the full article in the CPI Antitrust Chronicle

Related Articles

Unreliable Data Have Infected the Policy Debates Over Drug Patents

Adam Mossoff

The COVID-19 pandemic has vividly brought to the public’s attention the key role of medical innovation in saving lives and increasing the quality of...

Continue Reading

Google’s Loss to Sonos Settles It: Big Tech Has an IP Piracy Problem

Adam Mossoff

The U.S. International Trade Commission ruled on January 6 that Google infringed Sonos’ patented innovations in wireless speaker technology. This ma...

Continue Reading

A Harmful Step for the Internet In Korea

Harold Furchtgott-​Roth & Kirk R. Arner

Trouble is brewing for Korean Internet users. Government officials are actively considering legislation that would allow local Internet service provi...

Continue Reading