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President Wilson in Congress recommending the U.S. enter the war against Germany in 1917 (Historica Graphica Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
(Photo credit: Historica Graphica Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder

This event has been rescheduled to January 22, 2018.

One hundred years ago, two events ushered in the modern era. The first was America’s entry into the First World War in April 1917, which launched the United States onto the stage as a global superpower. The other was the Bolshevik Revolution, which created the Soviet Union and led a century of communist revolutions and totalitarian repression, of which China and North Korea remain the key legatees.

In his new book, 1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder, Hudson Institute Senior Fellow Arthur Herman explores the genesis and significance of those two events and the lives of the two men who set them in motion, Vladimir Lenin and Woodrow Wilson.

Join us on January 22 for an evening discussion on how Lenin and Wilson’s competing visions for creating a more perfect world order spawned a century of global disorder and set the stage for the geopolitical dilemmas facing us today.

Books will be available for sale at this event. A reception will begin at 4:30 pm and the discussion will begin at 5:00 pm. This event was originally scheduled for December 4, 2017.

Speakers

Arthur Herman Speaker

Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute and author of 1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder

Hudson Experts