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USS Vicksburg escorts the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt by the Rock of Gibraltar, March 31, 2015 (Anthony Hopkins II/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)
USS Vicksburg escorts the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt by the Rock of Gibraltar, March 31, 2015 (Anthony Hopkins II/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

Mounting Challenges to U.S. Naval Power: A Book Discussion with “Seablindness” Author Seth Cropsey November 9th Event

For decades, the U.S. Navy has experienced a decline in fleet size. Budgetary restrictions and increasing demands have taken a toll. While America’s Navy has shrunk in size, near-peer competitors have undertaken efforts to strengthen and modernize their own navies. Though the Trump administration has set a goal of rebuilding the Navy to a 350-ship fleet, the prospects for achieving that goal remain unclear.

On November 9, Representative Mike Gallagher of Wisconsin gave keynote remarks on the challenges ahead for the U.S. Navy. Following his remarks, Seth Cropsey, director of Hudson Institute’s Center for American Seapower, led a discussion about his recently published book, Seablindness: How Political Neglect is Choking American Seapower and What to Do About It. Rear Admiral James Stark (ret.) and Bryan Clark of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Studies joined Dr. Cropsey on the panel.

To view Mr. Clark’s slides, click here.

Speakers

Representative Mike Gallagher Keynote Speaker

U.S. Representative from Wisconsin

Seth Cropsey Moderator

Senior Fellow & Director, Center for American Seapower, Hudson Institute

Rear Admiral James Stark (ret.) Panelist

Former commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet Training Command

Bryan Clark Panelist

Senior Fellow, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA)

Hudson Experts

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