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The Quantum Revolution and Intellectual Property: Advancing and Protecting America's Innovative Edge September 12 Event

Within the next two decades, the quantum computing revolution will transform the world’s economies. Using the power of quantum physics, quantum processors will provide exponentially faster computers than current digital technology allows. That dramatically increased computing power will be able to solve some of the most complex mathematical and scientific problems known to man.

These tectonic technological shifts will also bring about new threats to today’s modern cryptography systems. Will America lead the way in the coming quantum revolution, or lag behind rivals like China? What role will intellectual property rights play in securing American leadership in this brave new quantum world, and how can quantum technology safeguard present and future patents and intellectual property?

On September 12, Hudson Institute and the Federalist Society, hosted a panel to discuss developments in quantum computing and intellectual property. The discussion featured leading experts on quantum technology and intellectual property and was moderated by Hudson Senior Fellow Arthur Herman.

To view Charles Duan’s slides, click here.

To view Stephen Ezell’s slides, click here.

To view Martin Laforest’s slides, click here.

Speakers

Arthur Herman Moderator

Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute; Director, Quantum Alliance Initiative

Charles Duan Speaker

Senior Fellow and Director of Tech and Innovation Policy, R Street

Stephen Ezell Speaker

Vice President, IT & Innovation Foundation

Martin Laforest Speaker

Senior Manager, ISARA Corporation and Fellow, Institute of Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Ontario

Chris Monroe Speaker

Professor of Physics, University of Maryland, and Chief Scientist, IonQ

Hudson Experts

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