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Video Event | Patents and Economic Development: Examining the Success of the Patent Tigers

Video Event | Patents and Economic Development: Examining the Success of the Patent Tigers

Please be advised: This event will be premiering at 9:00 a.m. EDT, Monday, June 1. You may view this event on Hudson’s website at or after its premiere time on this event page.

Conventional wisdom maintains that patents create barriers to economic development and should be avoided as a policy tool to promote economic growth in developing countries, as patents benefit only fully developed countries such as the G7.

However, strong correlations exist between countries that have significantly advanced their economic innovation and the patenting rates by their inventors at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO). Countries like South Korea, Taiwan, and Israel, identified as “patent tigers” in recent studies by Professor Jonathan Barnett given their extremely high rates of patents issued by the USPTO, have had some of the fastest developing innovation economies around the world. This finding is consistent with microeconomic-level studies that demonstrate how patents reliably facilitate commercialization.

Join Hudson Institute for a discussion with Professor Jonathan Barnett on the “patent tiger” phenomenon and the implications not only for developing countries seeking to build their economies, but also for the United States, which has significantly weakened its patent system over the past decade.

Speakers

Adam Mossoff

Chair of the Forum for Intellectual Property and Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute

Jonathan Barnett

Professor, Gould School of Law, University of Southern California

Hudson Experts

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