Skip to main content

The ‘Crisis of Democracy’ Is Overhyped

Walter Russell Mead

As Turkish strongman Recep Tayyip Erdogan lashes out against the “interest-rate lobby” for his country’s economic crisis, as Nicaragua’s dictatorship mobilizes against its own people, and as Venezuela’s socialist utopia sinks deeper into chaos, it’s remarkable how often we hear that a “crisis of democracy” is the defining political story of our times. And as Vladimir Putin’s persistent economic failures force him toward deeply unpopular pension reforms, it is even more remarkable how many people attribute this ostensible crisis to Russian cunning and might.

To read the full article on the Wall Street Journal website, click here.

Related Articles

Transcript: Advancing Religious Freedom Through U.S. Foreign Assistance: A Discussion with USAID Acting Administrator John Barsa

Nina Shea

Following is the full transcript of the October 27th, 2020 Hudson event titled Advancing Religious Freedom Through U.S. Foreign Assistance: A Discussi...

Continue Reading

What U.S. Election Means for Australia and China

John Lee

Donald Trump’s important legacy is that countering China is now a bipartisan mindset in Washington, but Biden is promising to more closely work and ...

Continue Reading

A US Trade Agenda for 2021: Bolstering Global Trade and Countering Chinese Economic Policy

Thomas J. Duesterberg

The most important and durable achievement of the Trump administration’s trade policy has been recognizing that China is not the “responsible stak...

Continue Reading