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Hudson Research on the Continuing Crisis in the Arab World

Hudson Institute

During the past weeks, the wave of unrest in Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen, Algeria, and Libya has led to significant changes in the political landscape of the Arab world. The protests and violence may result in devastating repercussions for U.S. allies in the region, with significant implications for U.S. policy toward Lebanon, Iran, and beyond.

Hudson Institute’s scholars, including Senior Fellows Nina Shea and Paul Marshall and Visiting Fellow Lee Smith, are analyzing the situation as it unfolds. Shea and Marshall have been a steady source of the latest news on the situation in Egypt; Smith analyses the wider ramifications of what he calls the “Autumn of the Patriarchs” in the Middle East.

Their analysis can be found on their bio pages, and they are available for comment, as is Senior Fellow Hillel Fradkin, a specialist on Islamist movements, and co-editor of Hudson’s prestigious journal, Current Trends in Islamist Ideology. Numerous other Hudson scholars including Senior Fellows Douglas Feith, former Undersecretary of Defense for Policy, and Hassan Mneimneh, the former head of the Iraq Memory Foundation are available for comment on U.S. policy options, as are scholars Ann Marlowe, Richard Weitz, and Gabriel Schoenfeld.

Hudson’s Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World has published numerous studies on the Muslim Brotherhood, including:




Leadership and Allegiance in the Society of the Muslim Brothers, by Ella Landau-Tasseron

Past events on Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood (audio and video available):

Irwin Stelzer on Economic Implications of the Situation in Egypt

 Douglas Feith on Democracy Promotion in the Middle East  



Selected Media:


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