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Multilateral Institutions: Indispensable or Irrelevant to Global Peace and Prosperity?

Multilateral Institutions: Indispensable or Irrelevant to Global Peace and Prosperity?

Hudson Institute will host a discussion on the relevance of multilateral institutions in today’s world. Skepticism is growing as to whether multilateral institutions are still an effective means of stopping international conflict and promoting economic growth. At the UN General Assembly’s annual gathering of world leaders in September, President Donald Trump said: the “future does not belong to globalists,” it “belongs to patriots.”

The United States and other countries across the world design their foreign policies with the main objective of promoting their own national interest, but the rules of the game for international cooperation are changing. Does this mean that multilateral institutions such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, and the World Bank have become irrelevant as tools for maintaining global order? Do they need to be redesigned to meet current global concerns? Or are they key to maintaining stability at a time of fluctuating alliances, trade wars, and increasing authoritarianism? This panel will address these questions and the future of U.S. engagement in multilateral institutions.

NOTE: This event is open to the press. All members of the media should RSVP to [email protected]

Speakers

Eli Whitney Debevoise

Former U.S. Executive Director of the World Bank

H.E. Martin Bille Hermann

Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Denmark to the United Nations

Kathryn Lavelle

Professor, Case Western Reserve University

Blaise Misztal

Fellow, Hudson Institute

Liselotte Odgaard

Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute

Hudson Experts

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