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Does Government Secrecy Really Keep Americans Safer?

Gabriel Schoenfeld

The Obama Administration has cracked down on leakers of classified information, and on reporters who refuse to reveal their sources. Now an open-government group is fighting back by advertising for whistleblowers in Washington. The first of 11 planned billboards has gone up near the State Department.

Edward Snowden and Chelsey Manning are accused of treason, but open-government advocates say whistleblowing should be part of American culture. Is secrecy used more to keep the public in the dark than to make Americans safer?

Click here to listen to the segment.

Norman Solomon, Executive Director, Institute for Public Accuracy (normansolomon) Gabriel Schoenfeld, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute (gabeschoenfeld)
Peter Van Buren, author, ‘We Meant Well’ (WeMeantWell) Andrew Beaujon, Poynter Online (abeaujon)

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