Skip to main content
Inside China’s War on Christians
Chinese Catholics hold candles at a mass on Holy Saturday during Easter celebrations at the government sanctioned West Beijing Catholic Church on April 15, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Inside China’s War on Christians

Nina Shea & Bob Fu

June 4, 1989, was a seminal day for China’s faithful, as the Chinese government massacred thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. The same day, Communist Party leaders watched as pro-democracy candidates in Poland supplanted Communist rule—with Pope John Paul II’s indispensable support. Together the events jolted Beijing into tightening its control over religion.

Post-Tiananmen, Christian groups were made to register with state “patriotic” associations or risk punishment as “evil cults.” Anxious to maintain access to Western markets, Beijing selectively enforced these rules in large cities. The rural Christian underground bore the brunt of church closings and mass internment of their members in labor camps.

Chinese Christianity still experienced spectacular growth in the next 30 years. Today there could be well over 100 million Chinese Christians. All but 36 million practice their faith outside government control. Purdue sociologist Fenggang Yang has projected that China could have nearly 250 million Christians by 2030. The Communist Party numbers 90 million.

Read the full article in the Wall Street Journal here

Related Articles

Direct Investment Shows Importance of US Relationship

John Lee

It is useful to occasionally be reminded of the importance of the economic relationship with the US. ...

Continue Reading

The Huawei Threat: China Considers Data to be Critical National Infrastructure

Robert Spalding

Is Huawei a national security threat? Judge for yourself. The people of Hong Kong and Taiwan can probably help you with the answer....

Continue Reading

Where To Now for the Trump Administration’s North Korea Policy?

Jack David

The first two summits with Kim Jong-un fell short, and optimism for the most recent one is hard to sustain. ...

Continue Reading